Followers

Saturday, April 13, 2019

ham radio operators worldwide. by the numbers!

Country Number of amateur
radio operators
% population Year of
Report
Source
 United States 822,768 0.251 2019 [3]
 Japan 435,581 0.343 2015 [4]
 Thailand 176,278 0.275 2006 [5]
 China 145,000 0.010 2018 [6]
 Germany 94,491 0.11 2016 [7]
 Canada 69,183 0.201 2011 [3]
 Republic of China 68,692 0.296 1999 [5]
 Spain 58,700 0.127 1999 [5]
 United Kingdom 58,426 0.094 2000 [5]
 South Korea 42,632 0.082 2012 [8]
 Russia 38,000 0.026 1993 [5]
 Brazil 32,053 0.016 1997 [5]
 Italy 30,000 0.049 1993 [5]
 Indonesia 27,815 0.011 1997 [5]
 France 14,160 0.02 2013 [5]
 Ukraine 17,265 0.037 2000 [5]
 Argentina 16,889 0.042 1999 [5]
 Poland 16,000 0.041 2000 [5]
 Australia 15,328 0.067 2000 [5]
 India 15,679 0.001 2000 [5]
 Malaysia 10,509 0.0004 2016 [5]
 Denmark 8,668 0.156 2012 [9]
 Slovenia 6,500 0.317 2000 [5]
 South Africa 6,000 0.012 1994 [5]
 Austria 5,967 0.068 2016 [10]
 Norway 5,302 0.106 2000 [5]
 Finland 5,000 0.090 2016 [11]
 Romania 3,527 0.018 2017 [12]
 Ireland 1,836 0.040 2017 [13]

Saturday, March 9, 2019

phonetic alphabet

Using The International Phonetic Alphabet

Eliminating confusion and demonstrating excellence in operating technique.
Hearing.JPG Almost from the time the telephone was invented people have had a need to unambiguously understand one another under less than ideal conditions. It’s one thing to talk face to face yet quite another to understand each other over weak, noisy and otherwise challenging conditions. Telephone spelling alphabets were developed to improve understanding when communicating under difficult conditions. Because of this I want to make the case that as trained Radio Amateurs we all need to use standardized spelling alphabets and in particular the International (NATO) phonetic alphabet.
Prior to World War II many nations used their own versions of spelling alphabets. Starting in 1941 the United States Army and Navy standardized an alphabet across all branches and that became known as the “Able Baker” Phonetic Alphabet. As militaries found the need to ally themselves with other militaries and organizations across the world it became clear that International standardization was needed.
Skipping ahead to the point of this discussion is that the International (NATO) Phonetic Alphabet is now the accepted standardized alphabet used by English speaking radio communications professionals in Aviation, Military, EMCOMM and others. Certainly we, as Amateur Radio operators working under less than ideal communications conditions, need this as much as anyone.
The 26 Code words in the NATO alphabet are as follows:
Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliett, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November,
Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.
Using these words under challenging conditions helps the operator get the message when only hearing partial words because the operator knows what to expect. If an operator hears a partial word, like “…ay” the trained operator will likely assume X-ray was the intended word when an improperly trained operator may have used Norway for the letter “N”. This nonstandard phrasing adds confusion, can cause delays for repeats and may cause inaccurate transcription of the intended message. These issues are greatly minimized when using standard phraseology.
Contest operators should be the quickest to adopt this use as it can expedite the contest exchange. However, I hear many casual contesters using non-standard phraseology which most often causes delays and repeats in crowded band conditions. No one wants delays when running rate is King!
When working DX stations, the accent of the operator can make some words hard to understand. But when using the standardized alphabet, a DL station that pronounces Whiskey as “Viskey” is easily understood. In aviation a pilot with a tail number N3656Y will always hear Yankee, never Yokahama regardless of the county he is operating. It’s this consistency that minimizes misunderstandings due to accents or conditions.

Monday, February 18, 2019

join us!

The Club meets every Thursday for coffee at 9:30 am at 5868 & Cessna St., Oliver, B.C. on the East side of the airport. 

Monday, February 11, 2019

Reminder...... MEETING TONIGHT@7PM

just a little reminder that our monthly club meetings are held @ 7PM SECOND MONDAY OF THE MONTH... THATS TONIGHT..  drop ins always welcome..

Saturday, February 2, 2019

Lets keep the antenna and shack warm!! Record cold on the way

Saturday
Morning
light snow
High:low:
-3°C-4°C
light winds
Saturday
Afternoon
light snow: 1cm
High:low:
-3°C-5°C
light winds
Saturday
Night
light snow: 2cm
High:low:
-7°C-11°C
light winds
Sunday
Morning
light snow
High:low:
-12°C-12°C
calm
Sunday
Afternoon
light snow: 1cm
High:low:
-13°C-14°C
calm
Sunday
Night
mod snow: 7cm
High:low:
-15°C-18°C
calm
Monday
Morning
light snow: 1cm
High:low:
-15°C-17°C
light winds
Monday
Afternoon
snow shwrs
High:low:
-14°C-17°C
light winds
Monday
Night
clear
High:low:
-18°C-19°C
light winds
Tuesday
Morning
some clouds
High:low:
-13°C-17°C
light winds
Tuesday
Afternoon
some clouds
High:low:
-12°C-15°C
light winds
Tuesday
Night
some clouds
High:low:
-15°C-15°C